Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Left; NBC: Everett

It’s often dangerous to generalize, but under threat, I would say that Americans are more “down the line.” They don’t hide their hopes and fears. They applaud ambition and openly reward success. Brits are more comfortable with life’s losers. We embrace the underdog until it’s no longer the underdog.We like to bring authority down a peg or two. Just for the hell of it. Americans say, “have a nice day” whether they mean it or not. Brits are terrified to say this. We tell ourselves it’s because we don’t want to sound insincere but I think it might be for the opposite reason. We don’t want to celebrate anything too soon. Failure and disappointment lurk around every corner. This is due to our upbringing. Americans are brought up to believe they can be the next president of the United States. Brits are told, “It won’t happen for you.”

There’s a received wisdom in the U.K. that Americans don’t get irony. This is of course not true. But what is true is that they don’t use it all the time. It shows up in the smarter comedies but Americans don’t use it as much socially as Brits. We use it as liberally as prepositions in every day speech. We tease our friends. We use sarcasm as a shield and a weapon. We avoid sincerity until it’s absolutely necessary. We mercilessly take the piss out of people we like or dislike basically. And ourselves. This is very important. Our brashness and swagger is laden with equal portions of self-deprecation. This is our license to hand it out.

This can sometimes be perceived as nasty if the recipients aren’t used to it. It isn’t. It’s play fighting. It’s almost a sign of affection if we like you, and ego bursting if we don’t. You just have to know which one it is.

Read more: http://ideas.time.com/2011/11/09/the-difference-between-american-and-british-humour/#ixzz23eyaDIbg

Having lived here for 6 years, married the love of my life, become a father to a wonderful son and fathered 2 gorgeous daughters, I can definitely confirm that America is indeed the land of opportunity!

However, there are things out there that can eat you! 

Now some may call me a coward.  If ignoring conventional wisdom of what I should do if ever I was to encounter a bear (shout, make myself bigger etc) and know that I would most likely instead cry out hysterically for my mother, then a coward be I!

Admittedly I grew up in a country with no native predators, which makes living in a country where there are beasts that can hunt you from the land, sea and sky somewhat of an alien concept.  However and this may be the coward in me – if you know they’re out there, why go and join them?!

My experiences are numerous so far.  The surfers who go into the water off the Californian coast, when there are signs clearly advertising that they are likely to be joined out there by a Great White shark.  The hikers who have regaled me with stories about bears outside their tents in Yellowstone.  The joggers who plod their way through wooded areas, hearing the sounds of mountain lions and coyotes as they run.

I mean….What?!…..Seriously?!….Hello!

Work colleagues tell me I’m stupid (amongst other things);  that there is nothing to be scared of.  Then we hear on the local news about a bear seen in our local park!  As I tell my friends, the neurotic Brit in me knows that while they may have survived their individual brushes with the native wildlife, I know for a fact that should I put one foot out there in the big bad wilderness, I’ll be eaten for sure.  Indeed, that’s if I’m not eaten while taking my kids to the park!

Therefore, I’m here to announce 2 things!

Firstly – a coward I may be, but a live coward I plan to remain.  The Discovery Channel will allow me to explore the ocean.  A room with a balcony in a hotel at Yellowstone will do me just fine!  I’ll buy a house with a big yard and play structure – who needs a park?!

Secondly – my announcement of one of the main platforms that I will run on when pursuing the Presidency (once a non US born citizen can be elected).

Here in Washington State, the biggest mountain is Mount Ranier.  As with all big mountains across the country, I’ll have a fence built, have the animals rounded up and put behind it.  All those that want to go and see them – have at it.  In the meantime, I and the millions like me (well, maybe just me) can live safe in the knowledge that monsters there may be, but at least they will be ‘there’ and not ‘here’!

Can we do it?  Yes we can!

Big Jump In Outside Hiring in 2011
 

After two years of looking internally to fill vacancies, companies in 2011 again began to hire new workers, relying on referrals and job boards for nearly 50 percent of their external hires.

Social media, though it accounted for only 3.5 percent of those external hires, evidences a much greater impact on hiring than the numbers would suggest, influencing candidates whose hiring ends up being attributed to other sources.

These are but a few of the findings in the just released 2012 CareerXroads Sources of Hire survey. Conducted now for a decade by the talent consultancy of Gerry Crispin and Mark Mehler, the annual survey queries the recruiting leaders of America’s largest companies about where they source the hires they make. Additional questions touch on emerging trends.

While Crispin and Mehler caution that the results reflect only the hiring practices of the participating companies, the survey has come to be an industry standard, occupying the top Google results for “source of hire,” and is one of the tools recruiters use in developing their own recruiting strategy.

This year’s survey found that in 2011 the 36 participating companies, which collectively have 1.2 million employees, filled 59 percent of their 213,375 openings externally. It’s a dramatic change from the last two years when half the openings were filled by internal transfers and promotions.

For full article… http://www.ere.net/2012/02/20/source-of-hire-survey-big-jump-in-outside-hiring-in-2011/

Available Jobs in the NY Startup Scene

 

Conductor, Inc – Technical Recruiter (Contract)

Required Skill Set
Conductor is looking for a high energy, highly motivated individual to join the HR team. Must have exceptional candidate generation, organization, possess strong verbal and written communication skills, have an ability to prioritize your time, sense of urgency, and understand the value of providing an amazing hiring experience.

What you are working on
In this role, you will be responsible for full life cycle recruitment. You will recruit for various open positions throughout the organization but primarily focus on developing our Technology team in New York.

Social Proof
Recognized as one of New York City’s Top 3 BEST PLACES to WORK, Conductor is one of the NYC’s fastest growing technology startups. Conductor is pioneering a billion dollar category of SaaS Enteprise SEO technology with incredible early traction, a world-class team from the bottom-up, and 140+ large brand customers.

Internships Available

Other available jobs and news from the NY startup scene http://www.insidestartups.org/

From Bill Boorman

I’m going to be delivering training next week to a team of corporate recruiters on effective ways to use twitter for sourcing talent. Whenever I run this workshop, it always reminds me how some of the most effective features in twitter are underused, in particular twitter lists and twitter searches.
I think the engagement aspects of the channel have been well covered., though I will talk a little more about this at the end of the post.  It stuns me when I hear of industry spokesman saying recruiters shouldn’t tweet, and shows a distinct lack of touch with reality. Twitter is the introduction channel. You need no invitation to follow anyone and engage with anyone. People are happy to talk to strangers about most things, and there is no real hierarchy of rank.

I know that if I invited recruiters to a networking event which was going to be attended by candidates and clients in their target market, you would be queuing up to attend. I think they would also be wise enough to know that once they got their, the conversation would be about a lot more than shop talk. They wouldn’t just walk up to everyone in the room and introduce themselves by saying “I’m a recruiter, do you want a job?”. There would be plenty of small talk about all number of things in order to start a relationship. Its part of networking. The people who talk only shop get shunned quite quickly, and new connections get tested out with questions or requests for advice from time to time. It’s a part of good networking, and why the concept of the elevator pitch is actually a bit of a joke as an introduction, though it helps to practice answering the question of what you do, without sounding like an a**e. It’s an inevitable question your going to get fairly early in a conversation. When I’m asked, My answer is that “I host unconferences and implement social recruiting plans.” That creates questions if they are wanted, without over pitching. The way you conduct yourself on twitter should not be any different, and small talk will form most of your conversation with any target contacts. This is a good thing, and part of the getting to know you process. In this post i want to share some tactics for organising your twitter followers and following, some applications that help organise you and how to make the channel work for you.

Another myth I want to challenge at the start of this post is that automated job feeds don’t work. Actually they do when they are operated correctly. I think anyone who recruits in any capacity should have one, and here’s why:

Among the social recruiting projects I’m involved in or have access to data, these accounts represent 20% of hires, and a higher volume of click-throughs. People are still actively looking for jobs in the way they always did, and that means searching via google, as well as other search engines, as well as searching in twitter. I’m not sure what the long term impact on this of the twitter feed coming out of Google search results, but right now it is still working, and there’s lots of searches going on within twitter itself. The key to making these posts effective is including location, using #’s for job type, job and location. It’s also important to list that the feed is a job feed, and not to expect engagement, (listing another account for connecting with recruiters for engagement.) Set the feed to post at different times during the day. You can use one of the excellent applications to do this like TwitJobSearch or TweetMyJobs, or alternatively do it yourself by setting an RSS feed to the twitter account or using an automated posting tool. The best I’ve seen at the moment for this is Buffer. Other tips that work are including the link in the middle of the tweet (5 times more likely to be opened), and where there is space asking for a retweet, it still works for increasing reach.

To read on… http://recruitingunblog.wordpress.com/2012/02/11/twitter-tricks-for-recruiters-socialrecruiting-trulondon/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

Thanks Bill!

by Lou Adler

This article is part of my continuing series on passive candidate recruiting. The key principle underlying all of these articles is that you can’t recruit and hire passive candidates using the same workflow, nor the same recruiters, used for active candidates.

According to a recent survey we conducted with LinkedIn, 83% of fully-employed members on LinkedIn consider themselves passive when it comes to their job-hunting status. While this is a huge and important pool, most companies over-emphasize the 17% of candidates who are active. Then to make matters worse, when they do target passive candidates, they clumsily use their active candidate processes.

To assist talent leaders in understanding the differences between active and passive candidate recruiting, I’ve developed a recruiter competency model addressing the similarities, differences, and overlaps. Contact me directly if you’d like to learn more about this. It’s highlighted in the graphic showing the 12 most important competencies alongside a very rigorous 1-5 ranking system. For example, a 4-5 ranking requires outstanding performance, some type of significant recognition, and continuing accolades from the recruiter’s hiring manager clients.

Here’s a quick summary of each of the competencies and the differences between active and passive recruiting requirements:

 
  1. Results-driven: Drive for a recruiter handling passive candidates requires the ability to tenaciously, but subtly, cajole and urge passive prospects through the hiring pipeline while deftly overcoming concerns. For a recruiter handling active candidates, drive is more about numbers and being sure there are enough reasonable candidates in the pool.

For full article… http://www.ere.net/2012/01/26/a-recruiter-competency-model-for-passive-candidates-2/

Thanks to http://twitpic.com/7mcntv for this!