Posts Tagged ‘Google’

From Bill Boorman

I’m going to be delivering training next week to a team of corporate recruiters on effective ways to use twitter for sourcing talent. Whenever I run this workshop, it always reminds me how some of the most effective features in twitter are underused, in particular twitter lists and twitter searches.
I think the engagement aspects of the channel have been well covered., though I will talk a little more about this at the end of the post.  It stuns me when I hear of industry spokesman saying recruiters shouldn’t tweet, and shows a distinct lack of touch with reality. Twitter is the introduction channel. You need no invitation to follow anyone and engage with anyone. People are happy to talk to strangers about most things, and there is no real hierarchy of rank.

I know that if I invited recruiters to a networking event which was going to be attended by candidates and clients in their target market, you would be queuing up to attend. I think they would also be wise enough to know that once they got their, the conversation would be about a lot more than shop talk. They wouldn’t just walk up to everyone in the room and introduce themselves by saying “I’m a recruiter, do you want a job?”. There would be plenty of small talk about all number of things in order to start a relationship. Its part of networking. The people who talk only shop get shunned quite quickly, and new connections get tested out with questions or requests for advice from time to time. It’s a part of good networking, and why the concept of the elevator pitch is actually a bit of a joke as an introduction, though it helps to practice answering the question of what you do, without sounding like an a**e. It’s an inevitable question your going to get fairly early in a conversation. When I’m asked, My answer is that “I host unconferences and implement social recruiting plans.” That creates questions if they are wanted, without over pitching. The way you conduct yourself on twitter should not be any different, and small talk will form most of your conversation with any target contacts. This is a good thing, and part of the getting to know you process. In this post i want to share some tactics for organising your twitter followers and following, some applications that help organise you and how to make the channel work for you.

Another myth I want to challenge at the start of this post is that automated job feeds don’t work. Actually they do when they are operated correctly. I think anyone who recruits in any capacity should have one, and here’s why:

Among the social recruiting projects I’m involved in or have access to data, these accounts represent 20% of hires, and a higher volume of click-throughs. People are still actively looking for jobs in the way they always did, and that means searching via google, as well as other search engines, as well as searching in twitter. I’m not sure what the long term impact on this of the twitter feed coming out of Google search results, but right now it is still working, and there’s lots of searches going on within twitter itself. The key to making these posts effective is including location, using #’s for job type, job and location. It’s also important to list that the feed is a job feed, and not to expect engagement, (listing another account for connecting with recruiters for engagement.) Set the feed to post at different times during the day. You can use one of the excellent applications to do this like TwitJobSearch or TweetMyJobs, or alternatively do it yourself by setting an RSS feed to the twitter account or using an automated posting tool. The best I’ve seen at the moment for this is Buffer. Other tips that work are including the link in the middle of the tweet (5 times more likely to be opened), and where there is space asking for a retweet, it still works for increasing reach.

To read on… http://recruitingunblog.wordpress.com/2012/02/11/twitter-tricks-for-recruiters-socialrecruiting-trulondon/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

Thanks Bill!

To my thousands of blog readers (well ok – maybe 3), my apologies for not having posted any new content recently. 

My good fortune in being allowed to play a small part in supporting the growth of LivingSocial worldwide, has led me to working on sourcing candidates in 5 new countries in recent weeks.  Balancing this with my own full-time job search activities, has therefore led to this being an interesting and challenging period to say the least!

When I started to chronicle my career transition in this blog, I felt hopeful and confident of the path that I was walking. 

My journey so far, walking the roads of contingency recruitment and the sourcing of a new full-time position, has taken me on a journey through the lands of the good, the bad and the ugly.

The Good!

LivingSocial – one of the fastest growing companies in the world.  A revolutionary player in the social commerce space, who build their business on core values of honesty, transparency of their service offering and a commitment to not only being the biggest in their sector but more importantly, the best.  It continues to be an honour to play my small part in their success.

The Wetstein Group – it is only through the opportunity provided by Stu Wetstein and his wife Jean, that I have been able to serve LivingSocial.  The experience of working with this team has led me to encourage a # of talented recruiters from my professional network to sign up and also benefit from the LivingSocial experience.  Paying it forward like this has  held the greatest joy of all.

Other contingency clients – I have been provided with the opportunity of serving a range of other company’s hiring needs in the last few months; experiences for which I continue to be grateful.

Recruitment to Recruitment – I am fortunate to be having my full-time job search complemented by a # of recruiters whose service levels, work ethic and skill make them stand out from their peers.  For this, I highly recommend them – Jackie Rees, Alex Sorrell and Will Wood

The Bad!

Recruitment to Recruitment – yes, again!  Call me old-fashioned as far as service standards are concerned, but if someone communicates with you, is it not courtesy to respond back?  Further and in what consistently gives this industry a bad name, if you are unable to apply basic service standards yourself, how can you demand them of others?  To qualify this, an overview of my recent experience:

  • I reach out to a # of new ‘recruiters for recruiters’, asking them to connect on LinkedIn, including a short message of what assistance I am looking for from them, in regards to my full-time job search.
  • Most reply, agreeing to connect.  Only 20% send any kind of accompanying message, along the lines of wanting further information and/or seeking to arrange an appointment to speak with me!  For the other 80% – Strike 1!
  • ‘OK’ I think, ‘I’ll try again’.  I send a longer message to the others, this time qualifying my job search criteria in more detail.  No responses for several days!  Strike 2!
  • Then hallelujah, 3 more replies!  Except these 3 (remembering that they have left it up to a week before replying in any shape or form), send me a message to the effect that they are disappointed that I have connected with other recruiters, as they only like working with candidates who give them 100% exclusivity and unless I will give them this (and ‘sack’ those who responded brilliantly to me as a potential new customer), then they are not interested in working with me!!  What!  Hello?!  Strike 3 and out!

The Ugly!

Stalkers – unfortunately, the downside of being as active as I am on the social networking platforms, is that in addition to the great new connections I have made, it also leads one to attract losers other followers as well – you know who you are!  All I can say to these new ‘fans’ of mine is, get a life!

So here I am, on my journey of professional adventure.  As ever, my family are by my side.  There may be further bad experiences along the way; possibly some more ugly ones. 

However, good experiences are being encountered every day, with great ones lying ahead of us.